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Do you know why Facebook – a site which is actually rather basic in terms of graphic identity – is so successful? Let's just remind ourselves of a few key figures: Facebook has 30 million users, receives 4 million registrations per month, is one of the top 20 most visited sites in the world, and racks up 15 billion page viewings a month. Impressive or what?

This pre-eminent position is based on two vital principles: targeting and ease of use. And there's no doubt that ease of use counts for a lot. It takes only a few clicks to register and the home page is well laid out, showing where all the sections are at a glance.

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picture-slogan describe the importance of engagement

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This ease of use encourages plenty of novice users to join. Of course, Facebook has many other qualities to recommend it, such as the numerous tools provided since it was opened up to developers, its high-quality network, and so on. But in my view, Facebook really stood out right from its launch, thanks to its simplicity. This also applies to other web services such as Doodle, Youtube, Skype and even the giant Google.

This simplicity and clarity are the result of information design, the main aim of which is to produce information accessible to everyone, promoting a real transmission of knowledge. The ability of users to learn to use a site effectively depends on the way this knowledge is constructed, organised and, finally, transmitted to them.

In practice, all this translates into the ability to find a style of design capable of transforming the act of gathering information into an experiential activity that provides a clear, accessible result for the user.

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